My Best Sourdough Recipe

26 thoughts on “My Best Sourdough Recipe”

  1. Thank you Anna for this post – the videos make it so easy to follow your recipe. Will try it as soon as my starter is mature. I just started a new one. Second loaf is beautiful as always!

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      1. Hi Anna, my bread was not a big success but the taste was superb. I used 90% wheat flour T65 and 10% spelt T110. My starter was still very young. It was built half from wheat flour T65 and half rye flour (from berrie I grind and sifted). I did not bake any sourdough bread since months and I noticed how fast one can loose the habit to manipulate a dough. Very interesting experience. I kept the bran from the rye berries and mixed it as in your recipe. I will give this recipe another try with a more mature starter. Keep following you here & on FB. Have a nice week! Warm and safe regards from Belgium.

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  2. Hello Anna, I love your bread and the way you explain and show various steps. I have one question though. For the dough you listed 200 g boiling water for the wholegrain flour and 500g + 10 g for bread flour but in a paragraph describing a step of adding water to bread flour there is “Combine the sifted flour, the bread flour and 525 g of water; cover and let it sit for two hours” I have been working to improve my technique and I know that more water is more hydration and it can be challenging at times. If don’t mind please make it clear 500 + 10 or 525 + 10. Thank you and best regards, Halina

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      1. Thank you for correcting. I will be baking tomorrow and let’s hope for the best. Have a good weekend. Best, Halina

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  3. Anna, sifting King Arthur Whole Wheat flour doesn’t seem to yield any bran. Can I use, say, Bob’s Red Mill Wheat Bran? If so, how much bran and how much whole wheat flour?

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    1. Hi Peter! I suspect your sieve isn’t tight enough. There should definitely be bran to shift out. To answer your question, you can use 100g of bran to 100g of KAF but then use white stoneground flour instead pf wholegrain. I hope this helps!

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  4. Thanks. I thought my sieve was pretty fine but it only yielded a minuscule amount of slightly darker material. I’ll try it with the bran.

    Thanks for all the info. Keep up the beautiful work!

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  5. I read the entire post again in the hopes that I would find a recommendation for a specific bread flour. What is the protein percentage in your bread flour and can you recommend a specific brand?

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  6. Hi Anna,
    I love this recipe! What would happen if I added the salt to the soaked bran, near the end, instead of adding them at different times? Is there a reason for that?
    I’m just trying to avoid staying up so late at night!

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    1. Hi Jane and thank you for your great question! The salt strengthens the gluten ties and you want the dough to be strong when you add the bran. Unfortunately, it is not a quick process. Best, Anna

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  7. Hi Anna, thank you for sharing your wonderful recipe. You mentioned toward the end you baked your second loaf on a baking steel with a pan of water underneath for 20 minutes. Will there be a difference in outcome if I baked my loaf in a steel pot with lid covered for 20 minutes to steam it? Thank you.

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    1. Hi and thank you for reading my post 😊 In theory a closed pot should work even better because it traps more steam! I just suggest that after the 20 min you take the loaf out of the pot for the final stage, so it browns all over

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  8. Hey Anna, I tried this lovely bread for several times. And my skills are growing. On your advice I used 10% less water because of the T65. I promised to let you know, and I can tell you my bread is lovely now. The taste is great. But there’s one loss. My husband and I don’t want to eat other bread 🙂 Thank you for sharing and your advice. Warm greetings.

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  9. I was intrigued by your process for this bread. I have been a long time sourdough bread maker. I have one question, however. When taking the bread from the refrigerator I assume you let it come to room temp and final rise before baking. Those details are not included in your recipe.

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  10. I will try that because the rise was almost too much-bread deflated when scored. The loaves came out well, chewy and airy. I will try again to perfect your method. It’s great to get ideas from someone passionate about bread baking. Thank you for the reply

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  11. Hi Anna
    I am new to baking sourdough. I read in your recipe that one of the ways to bake sourdough is to put the bread in a pot with lid in the oven. This is something new that I am reading for the first time. What is the purpose for putting the bread in a closed pot? Can you bake sourdough by putting it directly in the oven? By the way, I am so impressed by your scoring techniques. They are all so beautiful. I hope to be able to achieve it some day. Thank you in advance for your response.
    Evangelene

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    1. Hi Evangelene
      Thank you so much for reading my post and for your kind words! Baking in a covered pot allows you to trap the steam which facilitates the Maillard reaction, whereby the crust sort of caramelizes – turns brown and crisp. Commercial bread ovens have steam injectors for this but us home bakers have to improvise. You can definitely bake your bread uncovered but the result will be a paler, tougher crust.
      Good luck with your baking!

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